Using Writing to Learn

28 Jul

“Writing to Learn” is a phrase which has grown in meaning and application since its first usage. Toby Fulwiler and Art Young (“Introduction” to Language Connections: Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum) claim that using

Writing to communicate–or what James Britton calls “transactional writing”–means writing to accomplish something, to inform, instruct, or persuade. . . . Writing to learn is different. We write to ourselves as well as talk with others to objectify our perceptions of reality; the primary function of this “expressive” language is not to communicate, but to order and represent experience to our own understanding. In this sense language provides us with a unique way of knowing and becomes a tool for discovering, for shaping meaning, and for reaching understanding. (p. x)

Other teacher/scholars such as Syrene Forsman (“Writing to Learn Means Learning to Think”) talk about writing to learn as a way for students to “try a variety of thought processes in classes,” thus developing “considerable mental power. Writing is one of the most effective ways to develop thinking.” (p. 162)

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download

Loader Loading...
EAD Logo Taking too long?

Reload Reload document
| Open Open in new tab

Download

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.